Pairing in Class 3

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Learning Goals

  • Get to know a classmate and collaborate on technical work
  • Identify strengths and opportunities when observing others pair program
  • Screen share, type in front of others, and communicate technical concepts

Discussions

When you enter the breakout room with your partner, spend a few minutes getting to know each other, learning about their experience in Mod 0 so far. Then, discuss the following questions regarding yesterday’s assignment:

  • What is your understanding of Pair Programming, specifically the Driver Navigator style?
  • What stuck out to you while watching the video of Kaitlyn and Amy pair?
  • As it relates to pairing, what are you nervous about? Excited about? Confused about?

Deciding Roles

Below are two short exercises for you to pair on. Decide who will be the Driver and Navigator for the first challenge, then switch roles for the second exercise.

Exercises

Pairing Exercise 1

This exercise should look very familiar!

  1. Navigate to your root directory.
  2. If you have a Turing and/or Mod 0 directory, navigate to that (highly recommended)!
  3. Create a new directory called to_do. Inside of that directory, create a file called tasks.md.
  4. Initialize Git inside of the to_do directory so that we have Git available to track changes.
  5. Before you check the status, predict what it will say. Then, check the current status.
  6. Add tasks.md to the staging area.
  7. Make your first commit in this directory.
  8. Before you check the status, predict what it will say. Then, check the current status.
  9. Use Atom to add three separate tasks to tasks.md.
  10. Before you check the status, predict what it will say. Then, check the current status.
  11. Before you check the difference between your last commit and what the file looks like now, predict what it will say. Then, check the diff.
  12. Add the changes to the staging area.
  13. Before you check the status, predict what it will say. Then, check the current status.
  14. Commit the changes using a properly formatted commit message.
  15. Before you check the status, predict what it will say. Then, check the current status.


Pairing Exercise 2

This exercise does not explicitly prompt you to predict what will happen after running each command, but it's a habit we recommend you push yourself to building.

  1. Create a new directory called ruby_101. Inside of that directory, create a file called learning_ruby.md.
  2. Initialize Git inside of the ruby_101 directory so that we have Git available to track change.
  3. Check the current status.
  4. Add learning_ruby.md to the staging area.
  5. Commit your work.
  6. In Atom, create a header and either a fact or question about Ruby in the ruby_101.md file.
  7. Add the changes to the staging area.
  8. Commit the changes using a properly formatted commit message.
  9. Create a directory inside of ruby_101 titled practice. Inside of that, create 3 files - you choose the names.
  10. Add some content to each of the three files inside the practice directory.
  11. Add and commit your changes.
  12. Check the status to ensure you have a clean working tree.

Reflection

Follow the directions in this Gist and submit your fork of it in the submission form.

Note: Each student should make an individual submission.




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