Pairing in Class 5

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Learning Goals

  • Get to know another classmate and collaborate on technical work
  • Identify strengths and opportunities in oneself as a pair programmer
  • Become comfortable screen sharing, typing in front of others, and communicating technical concepts
  • Give and recieve peer feedback

Prepare

Before meeting with your partner, reflect on the following:

  • What have you enjoyed about pairing so far?
  • What has been challenging about pairing for you so far?
  • What is one thing you want feedback on from your partner at the end of this session? (It’s recommend you use the “one thing” from yesterday’s session, or another area you are pushing yourself to grow in!)
  • How do you prefer to give and get feedback for the previous question? (The how being the method of communication - in writing? Over zoom immediately, or over zoom after having time to reflect and prepare? Other?)

Be ready to share your answers with your partner.

Set Collaboration Expectations

Spend a few minutes getting to know each other and discussing the questions you were asked to prepare answers to. This will help set expectations for what you each need and can commit to doing, and is an important habit to build when you start a working relationship. You’ll be asked to reflect on both preparation questions (and how the session went in regards to those) after the pairing session.

Decide if you will share feedback live at the end of this call, or in writing via Slack DMs.

Then, decide who will be the Driver and Navigator for the first challenge, then switch roles for the second exercise.

Exercises

Note: Some language in used in these prompts that you have not had direct exposure to in the Mod 0 curriculum. This is intentional and designed to support you in being flexible while reading documentation and specifications (as that is an essential skill for a developer to have). Use your context clues, make educated guesses with the knowledge you have, and if you are completely unsure “does it mean X or Y?” - do the exercise both ways - x and y - just to cover yourself!

Back End

Pairing Exercise 1: Hashes

For this exercise, use a Git workflow.

  • In your Mod 0 directory, create a new directory called pairing_2. Inside of that directory, touch a file called hash_practice. Initialize a Git repository
  • Define a variable named person that stores a Hash. This Hash should have 4 key-value pairs; you choose the key and use appropriate Data Types for the values
  • Write code to print the entire Hash
  • Write code to print one of the key-value pairs
  • Run the file in the Terminal to verify your code is working as expected
  • Programmatically add 2 more key-value pairs to the Hash
  • Programmatically print out all the keys
  • Run the file in the Terminal to verify your code is working as expected
  • Run git log. Does your commit history tell the story of your progress on this challenge?


Pairing Exercise 2: Iteration

  • In your Mod 0 directory, create a new directory called pairing_2. Inside of that directory, touch a file called friends. Initialize a Git repository
  • Define a variable that stores an Array containing 8 Integers between 1 and 100
  • Write a program that checks each Integer, and prints out only those above 30
  • Run the file in the Terminal to verify your code is working as expected
  • Create a GitHub repository
  • Push your work from the local repository to the remote repository
  • Don't modify or delete any of your previous code; write another method that will check each Integer from the original Array, and print out only those under 60
  • Push that new work up to the remote repository


Front End

Pairing Exercise 1: Object Literals (Front End)

For this exercise, use a Git workflow.

  • In your Mod 0 directory, create a new directory called pairing2. Inside of that directory, touch a file called objectLiteralPractice. Initialize a Git repository
  • Define a variable named person that stores an Object Literal. This Object should have 4 key-value pairs; you choose the key and use appropriate Data Types for the values
  • Write code to print the entire Object
  • Write code to print one of the key-value pairs
  • Run the file in the Terminal to verify your code is working as expected
  • Programmatically add 2 more key-value pairs to the Object
  • Programmatically print out all the keys
  • Run the file in the Terminal to verify your code is working as expected
  • Run git log. Does your commit history tell the story of your progress on this challenge?


Pairing Exercise 2: Iteration

  • In your Mod 0 directory, create a new directory called pairing2. Inside of that directory, touch a file called friends. Initialize a Git repository
  • Define a variable that stores an Array containing 8 Numbers between 1 and 100
  • Write a program that checks each Number, and prints out only those above 30
  • Run the file in the Terminal to verify your code is working as expected
  • Create a GitHub repository
  • Push your work from the local repository to the remote repository
  • Don't modify or delete any of your previous code; write another method that will check each Number from the original Array, and print out only those under 60
  • Push that new work up to the remote repository


Feedback

Come back to the areas that you asked each other to provide feedback on.

Reflection

Follow the directions in this Gist and submit the URL to your fork of it in the submission form.




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